I’ve always been a big fan of Eric Lengyel, from both his work on the C4 Engine (and now the new Tombstone Engine) and his previous math book, Mathematics for 3D Game Programming and Computer Graphics, which is on it’s 3rd edition and is one of the definitive texts in the genre. This latest book, Foundations of Game Engine Development, Volume 1: Mathematics, I feel does it again and is well worth reading. The text, which clocks in at around 200 pages (short for a technical book) actually has a decent amount of information crammed into those pages. Lengyel breaks it up into 4 chapters, each focusing on a different aspect.Read More →

This book was quite an interesting read. Though a book of math and physics sounds like it would be boring, I found the text to be pretty engaging. At  688 pages, it’s not the longest technical resource, but the authors manage to pack a good deal in those pages. Of course, there is a lot of math in here, but that’s not all. Even some random topics like mazes and game theory pop up near the end. I really did enjoy the book and it seems worthwhile. Some of the areas of focus include even basic number representations, arithmetic, algebra and trigonometry, vectors and calculus, toRead More →

Game Programming Algorithms and Techniques is one of those books that tries to be as general as possible, and I believe the author was successful in that. Too many books target one specific piece of software or even one particular version of a framework and end up becoming dated rather quick. However, the core ideas in game development have not fundamentally changed in a while. Sure graphics get better, and there are more complexities to working with modern hardware, but the programming algorithms themselves are still very much the same. Sanjay Madhav starts the book with an overview of some classic games, how a gameRead More →

This book really is “The Essential Guide” for 3D character artists. Though you can probably make a decent model just following reference images and common sense, I think a solid basis of knowledge of the human form really is the foundation for taking your art to the next level of realism. If you are looking for that foundation, or just want to up your skills in the character department, look no further. The chapter structure in Anatomy for 3D Artists has a variety of different artists tackling a few chapters each, giving the book some different flavor and allowing for these best-in-breed artists to highlight theirRead More →

Programming Game AI By Example by Mat Buckland is one of those books that comes highly recommended and was one I had been meaning to read for a long time. In fact, I originally purchased the paperback in 2006 and never got around to reading it. The interesting part is that the book is still very much relevant today and is not dated in the least. Well now maybe some of the engines and middleware have this stuff built in, but the fundamentals I think I still important to understand. The book starts with a quick primer on math and physics. The basics are explained,Read More →

Getting Started with Unity 5 is mostly what it bills itself as: a way to get started in Unity for beginners. The book is clearly targeting beginners, and takes the reader from having never used Unity to making a simple farming-type game. I enjoyed reading it (in the whole 3 days it took to finish), however I’m not sure exactly how much I learned (if anything at all). At 195 pages, the book is not extremely thorough, but does cover a lot of the basic fundamentals of game development with Unity. Unfortunately, that coverage is brief and only really scratches the surface. Some of the topics featured include:Read More →

Right here is a book with a clearly defined goal and an excellent execution. Learning C++ by Creating Games with UE4 by William Sherif takes you on a journey from being a total blank in C++ to coding some basic features of a 3D game. Even though I have been coding in C++ for years, I still enjoy reading novice level texts as sometimes they can teach you a new way of thinking about familiar problems. For me, it’s also important to have good book recommendations (especially for people starting out), and I actually discovered this book from a member of the Unreal Engine community lookingRead More →

In this tutorial, I will show how to make a cube roll from side-to-side on a grid. This project took me around 3 days to complete, though much of that was wrapping my head around basic things in UE4. Some of the areas explored here include setting up key bindings and action mapping, setting and clearing timers, and rotating around an arbitrary point. First, you want to start by setting up the action mapping. What this does is basically binds an input button (like a keyboard key) to a particular action (really just a name that you make up). For this test I needed 4Read More →

This is a book with a solid focus, and I feel like it accomplishes it’s goal nicely. Basically what Maya Studio Projects is about is creating environment objects and props for games (as the title implies). There are 9 chapters, and each one chooses a different object to model. McKinley is very detailed in his explanation, and really shows each and every step needed to follow along. Some of the objects modeled include walls and floors, foliage, weapons, vehicles, buildings, lamps, and a simple object animation. Supposedly there is a DVD companion, but I got the Kindle e-book and usually don’t bother with looking at the discs. WhatRead More →

This was a short book, so I’ll give it a short review. Basically, 101 Autodesk Maya Tips is exactly what it sounds like: a compilation of quick tips for using Autodesk Maya. Some of the tips are as brief as one sentence, but a few are more involved. It seemed like the majority of the content was based around Mel scripting, and various ways to automate particular tasks. I have not worked with Mel scripting much, and am still trying to wrap my head around the interface and UI of Maya. Girard does, thankfully, include some more basic tips as well. With a book like this, IRead More →