Essential Mathematics for Games and Interactive Applications by James M. Van Verth and Lars M. Bishop is a quality math book if I ever saw one.  Strangely, the first edition came out in 2004 but the book was kind of off my radar until recently.  This third edition was published in 2015 and seems very current. The authors here do a great job of explaining the material properly. I felt like they created a great foundation for learning these complex ideas and I appreciated the  quality and readability of the code  samples. The book starts with an overview of computer number representations, and goes intoRead More →

So 2017 will be my year of “doing the work,” a line I learned from Steven Pressfield in his excellent book named, unsurprisingly, “Do the Work.”  I’ve spent literally years reading about 3D math and physics and, outside of a few small demos I’ve experimented with and never released, I haven’t actually produced anything. I’ve also been inspired and motivated by a variety of books, most recently “Little Bets” which talks about innovators from Steve Jobs to Pixar and how they developed their craft. So, hopefully this year I can work on various smaller projects to hone my skills and really apply the knowledge I’ve gained.Read More →

Beginning Math and Physics for Game Programmers by Wendy Stahler is the kind of book I like. The title is straight-forward, and the content actually delivers what it claims. I’ve read a number of game development math books but I find that many of them expect a college level mathematics background, or at least some intermediate knowledge already. Not here. This is a book that is accessible to stark beginners, and I’d even recommend it to high school students. Stahler’s text covers all the basics for both 3D math and physics. Topics include: points and lines, geometry, trigonometry, vector and matrix math, transformations, unit conversions,Read More →

This book was quite an interesting read. Though a book of math and physics sounds like it would be boring, I found the text to be pretty engaging. At  688 pages, it’s not the longest technical resource, but the authors manage to pack a good deal in those pages. Of course, there is a lot of math in here, but that’s not all. Even some random topics like mazes and game theory pop up near the end. I really did enjoy the book and it seems worthwhile. Some of the areas of focus include even basic number representations, arithmetic, algebra and trigonometry, vectors and calculus, toRead More →

  It’s been some time since the last 3D engine update, but I’m still sticking with it. Currently I am working on getting a physics engine implemented. The video you see above is the first glimpse of this custom physics engine. Obviously it’s ultra basic right now, but it’s a start. The algorithm is based on a verlet integrator, and the code is running using DirectCompute on the GPU. To be honest, it’s pretty hacked together right now, and the bounds/bouncing behavior is hard-coded. But, hey, it’s something! I also tweaked the style of the demo to more closely align with other demos from researchersRead More →

Game Physics Pearls has been a book on my wishlist for a while, and I’ve finally got the chance to finish reading it and putting up this review. The text is edited by Gino van den Bergen and Dirk Gregorius, and each chapter is written by a unique author. I found that a lot of ground was covered while still keeping the book somewhat cohesive. It doesn’t feel like a complete random mash-up, and the progression is nice. Some of the chapter content includes: basic mathematics, game physics pitfalls, broad phase, narrow phase, GJK, SPH, parallel particle simulation, ropes, soft bodies, and verlet integration. Even afterRead More →

Today I will be reviewing Physics for Game Programmers by Grant Palmer, another stepping stone on my quest to build a custom physics engine. Overall I enjoyed reading the book, and I feel like I learned a lot of general things but not enough to base a physics implementation on. Please read on for more details. What I found most interesting about this text was the explanations of certain aspects of physics that I had not seen covered before. I have already read about 3 or 4 different books all on game physics, and I was expecting this title to be more of a refresherRead More →

I can say I had a pretty good time with Physics for Game Developers: Science, math, and code for realistic effects by David M Bourg & Bryan Bywalec. It is a very approachable text, and makes a somewhat complex topic more manageable with concrete examples. It’s definitely a book about 3D physics, but many of the samples are done in 2D for clarity. I did not find this to be an issue, and most of the equations and code were digestible. I did see some heat on the reviews, saying that there were errors in some of the code. I could not verify this, butRead More →

In this review, I will discuss my experience with Game Physics Engine Development: How to Build a Robust Commercial-Grade Physics Engine for your Game by Ian Millington. This is actually the first book I’ve ever read solely on game physics and I think I made the right choice here. Although I have developed several physics engines previously, they were only in 2D and the extra dimension complicates matters significantly. Game Physics Engine Development is a book specifically about 3D game physics, though the author does make a short reference to 2D physics at the end. I felt like the book had just enough math to explainRead More →

  This has got to be one of the more insane physics demos I’ve seen so far. Most physics engine handles the basic rigid bodies and such, but start to fall apart with more complex interactions (i.e. fluid and cloth simulations). With the demo shown above, from Nvidia, it seems these difficult problems have been solved. Cloth, fluid, smoke, and rigid or soft bodies, all interacting with each other? It looks great. The author, Mike Macklin, has even posted a pre-release of the SIGGRAPH paper explaining the technique here. I took a quick look, and I will be giving it some serious investigation soon. These types ofRead More →