WebGL: Up and Running by Tony Parisi is a competent first introduction to 3d on the web, and the author does seem to know what he’s talking about. The book is not long, but manages to cover a variety of topics, even the source code for a complete game (simple as it may be). The chapters include: introduction to the WebGL API, setting up Three.js, rendering a mesh, animation, interaction, integrating 2d and 3d, and a game example. I would say the coverage is thin, but adequate for people starting out. The example racing game at the end was nice, and the author shows the full Javascript and HTML code, which was appreciated.

Overall, I’d say the book was decent but there are a few faults. Namely, that the book is called “WebGL: Up and Running” but there is actually very little WebGL API code in these pages. The first chapter shows some, but after that it’s all using Three.js. Don’t get me wrong, Three.js is a useful library, but I would preferred to see how to do these things using the straight API. Furthermore, the author uses his own framework built on top of Three.js, obscuring some of the core concepts. Granted, his framework looks good, but it means a good amount of the code examples in the book will not work unless you are using that framework (and I would guess you are not). That said, I still found the book helpful even if I would have preferred a more low-level survey.

I think the target audience for this book is people with web development experience but not necessarily game developers. The book does assume you know some Javascript and looks at things at the higher level, useful if you just want to embed a 3d model in a website for example. For more serious game developers, or people wanting the learn, I feel that the coverage is too cursory, and really only scratches the surface. Rather than “WebGL: Up and Running” it should have been called “Three.js: Up and Running” as that is what it is (ignoring the custom framework added on top of Three.js). Experienced developers looking to create their own engine won’t find the low-level details, and for beginners there is not really much 3d math so you won’t learn the basics here either. In this way, it’s a more practical book. Meaning if you just want to get some 3d “up and running” then this will get you there, you just may not understand why it works. But the book is well written and may be useful as a light entry into the field.

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