Introduction to Computer Graphics and the Vulkan API by Kenwright is exactly what the title implies, an approachable introduction to the Vulkan API and graphics programming in general. This book succeeds in the places where some other books on the market fail, by showing straight-forward code examples, explaining graphics concepts simply, and not assuming you are already a graphics guru. While the quality of the text may fall short of Frank Luna’s work, this is definitely aspiring to be that kind of book, in stark contrast to some other texts which just list structure declarations and barely move past what you find in the API documentation.Read More →

I’ll cut to the chase: this book is one of the best introductions I’ve seen to the C++ language. I’ve read probably at least a dozen C++ books and I would say this would be the best place to start if you’ve never used C++ or even as your first programming book. There are some great C++ resources out there, but much of the material can be too advanced for a beginner and will probably scare you off before you get anywhere. With Beginning C++ Through Game Programming, Michael Dawson builds your knowledge from the ground up. The explanations are clear and easy to understandRead More →

Although the Vulkan API has been available for about a year now, it was just at the tail end of 2016 that we started to see books published on the topic. For me personally, I prefer learning from books over just reading documentation, and Vulkan Programming Guide is a fine effort. At 480 pages, it is a comfortable length, and manages to hit on a lot of major elements in the API. It is by no means comprehensive, as most of the coverage just shows function or structure prototypes (something you can likely find in the online docs) but there is at least some explanation ofRead More →

Learning Vulkan by Parminder Singh is an excellent foray into the Vulkan graphics API and quite a competent book. The text is a reasonable 466 pages, and packs a lot in there. Singh covers all the basics of using Vulkan and goes into great detail at each step of the way. Not only is there actual C++ code shown (a lot of it), but he explains each API call and what objects to pass it, a breakdown of each object structure and what it does, what’s valid (or invalid) for data you can put in, and so forth. I have not read the official Vulkan Programming Guide yet (that’sRead More →

Vulkan Graphics API: in 20 Minutes is a short, no-nonsense, introduction to the Vulkan graphics API. Though the title of the book says “20 minutes,” I believe I spent somewhere between 1 and 2 hours to finish it (though I admittedly read pretty slow). This is the type of book I wish there were more of: something short and sweet as a brief intro to get your feet wet. I feel many programming books can be daunting at 600+ pages, so it’s nice to find something you can complete in one or two sittings. So what is actually covered in this little book? Basically itRead More →

Essential Mathematics for Games and Interactive Applications by James M. Van Verth and Lars M. Bishop is a quality math book if I ever saw one.  Strangely, the first edition came out in 2004 but the book was kind of off my radar until recently.  This third edition was published in 2015 and seems very current. The authors here do a great job of explaining the material properly. I felt like they created a great foundation for learning these complex ideas and I appreciated the  quality and readability of the code  samples. The book starts with an overview of computer number representations, and goes intoRead More →

Beginning Math and Physics for Game Programmers by Wendy Stahler is the kind of book I like. The title is straight-forward, and the content actually delivers what it claims. I’ve read a number of game development math books but I find that many of them expect a college level mathematics background, or at least some intermediate knowledge already. Not here. This is a book that is accessible to stark beginners, and I’d even recommend it to high school students. Stahler’s text covers all the basics for both 3D math and physics. Topics include: points and lines, geometry, trigonometry, vector and matrix math, transformations, unit conversions,Read More →

Programming Game AI By Example by Mat Buckland is one of those books that comes highly recommended and was one I had been meaning to read for a long time. In fact, I originally purchased the paperback in 2006 and never got around to reading it. The interesting part is that the book is still very much relevant today and is not dated in the least. Well now maybe some of the engines and middleware have this stuff built in, but the fundamentals I think I still important to understand. The book starts with a quick primer on math and physics. The basics are explained,Read More →

Right here is a book with a clearly defined goal and an excellent execution. Learning C++ by Creating Games with UE4 by William Sherif takes you on a journey from being a total blank in C++ to coding some basic features of a 3D game. Even though I have been coding in C++ for years, I still enjoy reading novice level texts as sometimes they can teach you a new way of thinking about familiar problems. For me, it’s also important to have good book recommendations (especially for people starting out), and I actually discovered this book from a member of the Unreal Engine community lookingRead More →

So it comes with great reluctance but I think I will have to suspend development on my 3D game engine, at least for the near future. Surely this will be a disappointment to anyone following the progress and I did not make the decision lightly. After spending some time thinking about it, I think it’s the right move. It’s just really hard to justify the amount of time and effort put into this when there are much better solutions available off-the-shelf. In the little less than 2 years I’ve worked on this project, I think I have made decent strides. Honestly, I was not working on itRead More →