Creating a 3D Game Engine (Part 21)

After a few days of hacking away at the code, I’ve got a new video up. In this update I have added normal mapping and specular lighting. I did have a few set-backs while working on the shaders, and it was made even more difficult since I was basically “flying blind” without a debugger. It seems that the Express version of Visual Studio

Creating a 3D Game Engine (Part 20)

Spent the last couple days adding in skybox support into the engine. Currently it’s a little hard-coded, but it does seem to be working well. I also bumped the field of view (FOV) up to 90 (from 45) so you can see more of the sky. I wanted to make sure I was only using my own artwork for this engine demo. Unfortunately,

Creating a 3D Game Engine (Part 19)

While getting models loaded was pretty exciting, I ended up dealing with major load times on the demo. Granted, my XML parsing code is probably slow as all hell, but I don’t think COLLADA is really designed for real-time engine use. With simple plane and cube shapes the loading wasn’t that bad, but with my soda can model (around 600 triangles) the loading

Creating a 3D Game Engine (Part 18)

What you see above is a custom model I made in 3ds Max, exported as a COLLADA *.dae file, and imported into my DirectX engine. I figured I’d start with something simple, like a soda can, and I plan to make a lot more models going forward. Although I hadn’t touched Max in years, I found it to be a comfortable experience and

Creating a 3D Game Engine (Part 17)

Programmer art is great and all, but I’d really like to see some complex models inside the engine. Unfortunately, DirectX 11 does not include a built-in way to load in 3D models. As I’ve mentioned before, I am interested in using COLLADA has the import format. Since COLLADA is based on XML, I will need a way to load and parse XML files.

Insane Physics Simulation From Nvidia

  This has got to be one of the more insane physics demos I’ve seen so far. Most physics engine handles the basic rigid bodies and such, but start to fall apart with more complex interactions (i.e. fluid and cloth¬†simulations). With the demo shown above, from Nvidia, it seems these¬†difficult problems have been solved. Cloth, fluid, smoke, and rigid or soft bodies, all

Creating a 3D Game Engine (Part 16)

After some more testing, it looks like OGRE is not the savior it seemed like yesterday. While the static geometry boosted frame-rates greatly, it’s only useful for, well, static objects. Meaning the models can’t move or animate. I did find another option, instancing, which initially looked promising. It allows rendering of large amounts of identical objects faster than just having them be individual.

Creating a 3D Game Engine (Part 15)

Looks like I spoke too soon. While OGRE was getting pretty slow with the naive implementation, I was able to find some code on what they call StaticGeometry, which is a system to batch together lots of similar meshes that don’t move (great for my cube example project). With this feature added, the frame rate has sky-rocketed to over 2,600 fps. Most impressive.

Creating a 3D Game Engine (Part 14)

Seeing as performance has been on my mind recently, I tweaked the core render loop a bit and saw some reasonable gains. The one thing I realized is that most of the objects in the scene are static, and don’t need their combined transformed matrices recalculated every frame. I expected to see wild improvements after caching the values. What I received was a decent